Pectin

Questions
Published: 2005-03-03

Asalaamu Alaikum brother/sister

There is an ingredient often found in cakes and things called Pectin, sometimes this is written in associatiion with gelling agent. Do you know what this is and if it is permissable.

Kind Regards

Kasim Jahangeer

Answer
Views: 4,185,764
Updated: 2005-03-03
Pectin is Halaal.
 
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pectin
Dictionarypec·tin (pek'tin)
n. Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.
[French pectine, from Greek pektos, coagulated, from pegnunai, to coagulate.]
pec'tic or pec'tin·ous adj.
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 The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2004, 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 
 
 
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Encyclopediapectin, any of a group of white, amorphous, complex carbohydrates that occur in ripe fruits and certain vegetables. Fruits rich in pectin are the peach, apple, currant, and plum. Protopectin, present in unripe fruits, is converted to pectin as the fruit ripens. Pectin forms a colloidal solution in water and gels on cooling. When fruits are cooked with the correct amount of sugar, and when the acidity is optimum and the amount of pectin present is sufficient, jams and jellies can be made. In overripe fruits, the pectin becomes pectic acid, which does not form jelly with sugar solutions. Commercial preparations of pectin are available for jelly making. An indigestible, soluble fiber, pectin is a general intestinal regulator that is used in many medicinal preparations, especially as an antidiarrhea agent.
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  The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition Copyright © 2003, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/ 
 
 
Medicalpec·tin (pek'tin)
n. Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.
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 The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. 
 
 
Food GlossaryPectin
Present in various ripe fruits and vegetables, this natural, water-soluble substance is used for its thickening properties in the preparation of jams, jellies and preserves. The gelatin-like pectin is added to fruits that don't have enough natural pectin to Jell by themselves. If pectin isn't used, the alternative is to continue cooking the mixture until it's reduced to the desired consistency. Pectin only works properly when mixed with the correct balance of sugar and acid. It's available in two forms-liquid (usually made from apples) and dry (from citrus fruits or apples). 
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Meaning #1: any of various water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates that occur in ripe fruit and vegetables; used in making fruit jellies and jams
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 WordNet 1.7.1 Copyright © 2001 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
 
 
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Wikipediapectin
Pectin is a heterosaccharide in the cell wall of plants. Pectins are very variable in composition; chain lengths are variable and there is a very large variation in the combination and order of each of the monosaccharide derivative units. It is a breakdown product from hemicelluloses (protopectins) which is generated during ripening of the fruit. Pectin itself is later broken down to pectinic acid and finally pectic acid. During this chemical breakdown process, the fruit gets softer as the cell walls degenerate.
 
Apples, plums and oranges contain much pectin, while soft fruits like cherries and strawberries contain little pectin.
 
Under acidic conditions, pectin forms a gel. This effect is used for making jams and jellies.
 
Pectin is commonly used as the active ingredient in cough drops because it coats the upper trachea and prevents the spasms which precede coughing.
 
Pectin is sometimes found in yogurt.